Page last updated

 

 

 NAVIGATION
 MINISTRY TOOLS
 DPS COMMUNITY
 MEMBER SERVICES

 

9th Sunday after Pentecost
St. Thomas Day - St. Thomas, the Doubter
Psalm 23 Resources


Closing Prayer:

You, o LORD, are full of compassion and love. We turn to you, Shepherd of our soul. Lead us to green pastures, we pray; teach us what is good and profitable in your sight. As your Son has shown compassion to the people of Galilee, show also compassion to us. Forgive our sins, cleanse us from all unrighteousness, heal our infirmities, and deliver us from our trials.

We ask these things in the name of our Savior Jesus and through the power of the Holy Spirit now and forevermore. Amen.


 

Sermons


Children's Message
 

Sheep without a Shepherd
a children's sermon based on Mark 6:30
by Rev. Frank Schaefer
props: none

"...Jesus saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd."

Good morning boys and girls. Today, I didn't bring anything to show you because you can all help me with this children's sermon. I need you to pretend to be sheep. Now, who knows anything about sheep? What do they sound like? What do they do? What do they eat? Are they by themselves or in a group with other sheep? Who makes sure that all the sheep stay together? (the shepherd).

In today's Bible reading we heard that Jesus felt sorry for the people because they were like sheep without a shepherd

I need you to be sheep this morning. Can you walk on all fours and go "baaaaaaaaaaah?" Ok. Here is what I need you to do: walk on all fours in a perfect circle--one walking after the other going round in a big circle. (Unless you have very organized kids, they will have difficulty following this direction)...

..
.. Subscribers: click here for
the full manuscript

 

Sermon Excerpt

It Is For All People
Ephesians 2:11-22
by Rev. Wright

What is it like to be a stranger? I'd like you to think about a group you're part of fairly regularly, a group in which you are different in some way from most of the other people. Maybe you're the only woman on a planning team at work, the only girl in a woodworking class, the only boy taking ballet, or the only man learning to quilt. Maybe when all the relatives get together, you're the oldest one in the room. Maybe you're the only white person in the group you're thinking of, or the only person of color. Maybe you're the only one in the group who uses a wheelchair or who is visually impaired.

Have you thought of a group where you can say, "I'm the only one"? Now, what's it like?

Several years ago I went to Liberia as part of an assessment team for The United Methodist Church. UMCOR sent us there to see how the church might respond to the tremendous humanitarian need after the civil war. As we visited some of the centers that had been set up for those who had been displaced from their homes and villages, we noticed people staring at us. These were schools, unfinished buildings and camps with grass huts where literally thousands of people lived. As we walked through the children ran after us. Finally someone said many of these children had never seen a white person. They shouted, "Take a picture of me, white man." They wanted to pose with us for pictures. They wanted us to squat down so they could feel our hair because it was not as curly or as course as their own. In that setting I understood the feeling of being a stranger, different from everyone else in my surroundings.

What was it like for our team to be so different from almost everyone else there? I was lonely. If it hadn't been for the others on our team and the few people there that I knew through other associations, it might have been unnerving. When the people spoke in their tribal languages - as many of them did when speaking to one another - I couldn't understand what they were saying. Regardless of the friendliness of the people, we were strangers in the land, strangers in a different culture.

In biblical times, most people lived in small communities, places where the presence of a stranger was as quickly noted as a White person in a Black culture.... Subscribers: click here for the full manuscript

_________________________________________

Not a subscriber yet?  Click here to subscribe now and gain instant access to these resources plus an ENTIRE YEAR of weekly resources for only 39.95!!